Archives For July 2014

Frontline ImageWow…my last REQUIRED blog post.  When I first heard that I was going to have to keep a blog, I groaned internally.  The idea that I was going to have to write every week worried me.  But, in the end, I took to it like a fish does to water, probably because I am opinionated and passionate person who always seems to have a lot to say.

One problem I have is that I am not always good at following the rules.  My Twitter bio even tells you I am a renegade pre-service teacher.  So it should be no surprise that my final post doesn’t exactly follow the directions as outlined by my professor.

One of my earliest posts was about another PBS production, Digital Media* New Learners of the 21st Century.  I enjoyed this video so immensely, I actually found myself writing a SECOND post about all my thoughts unrelated to the assignment.    So naturally I was thrilled when I saw Quest 2 Learn and one of its founders featured in this new video.  For this last post I found myself once again watching the amazing PBS – specifically a FRONTLINE episode titled “Digital Nation”.  This video features Douglas Rushkoff, who I have grown to really admire over the course of ED554, as we explore many digital topics where his opinions are rendered. Continue Reading…

mobile-handKids today live in an extremely connected world and they crave the instant gratification that can come with that level of connectivity.  They think so differently than generations of children before them.  They shift gears and thoughts before any adult can even blink an eye.  And this can lead to carelessness.  They post without thinking and that could come back to haunt them later.

Lisa Nielson suggests one reason to allow smartphones because we should be educating students with the tools they will use when they get to their professional life.  The idea of allowing cell phones in class on the premise that kids will be using smartphones in real life doesn’t work for me.  It’s one thing to argue on the basis of connectivity, collaboration, access to Blackboard, etc., but to suggest that we have an obligation to help students become proficient in their smartphone use is just silly in my honest opinion. Continue Reading…

Flipped learning is awesome, especially when there are awesome tools like PowToon available.  I really loved it and could go on, but you should check out my review on edshelf.com.

In the meantime, enjoy some math!

Going Off the Deep End

July 14, 2014 — 2 Comments

Going whole hog, go big or stay home, jump in with both feet – there are dozens of idioms to describe what I did on July 2.  I tweeted…

I have to add a little disclaimer here.  Continue Reading…

one sizeDigital native?  Digital immigrant?  Are these things even real?  Depends on who you ask.  I do think some people take to technology more quickly than others.  If they didn’t, why would marketers have coined the term early adopters?  But are these labels enough to understand the ever-evolving world of tech, and more importantly, how can they, if at all, help us understand how this rollercoaster of buttons and apps applies, or should apply to education?

Speak Up is this great initiative to gain insight into student brains by Project Tomorrow, a non-profit that is “dedicated to the empowerment of student voices in education.”   Their annual report is full of facts and figures related to when, how, why, and where kids are using, or want to be using, technology in their learning.  So how does Speak Up get into these students’ thoughts?  Wait for it…THEY ASK THEM!  Such a novel idea, really.  They outline their findings in The New Digital Learning Playbook:  Understanding the Spectrum of Students’ Activities and Aspirations. Continue Reading…